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protien sources from vegies

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i've heard mushrooms have a good ammount of protien is this true or not?

 

list yours?

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Sources of protein

 

Meat:

180g raw rump steak lean only grilled, 33g

110g grilled lean only blade steak, 32g

1 cup raw mince, 46g

85g beef liver grilled, 23g

95g grilled lamb midloin chop, 11g

100g lean cooked pork, 23g

50g or 2 slices of average ham, 5.5g

 

Chicken:

100g skinless cooked average white chicken, 28g

80g breast no skin, 22g

100g or 1/4 chicken takeaway style, 25g

 

Fish:

100g raw white fish, 17.5g

100g grilled fish, 21g

1 canned tuna, 29g

100g pink salmon, 20g

35g sardines, 9g

100g crab meat, 20g

1/2 cup cooked prawns, 12g

6 medium raw oysters, 6.5g

1 lobster cooked, 22g

 

Eggs:

whole, 6g

yolk only, 3g

white only, 3g

plain omelet, 2 eggs, 13g

 

Cheese:

30g firm, 7.5g

30 reduced fat, 25g

30 cottage, 5g

30 ricotta, 3.3g

 

Cereal:

30 raw Rolled oats, 3.6g

3/4 cup porridge, 3.6g

1/4 cup nautral muesli, 2.9g

20g barley bran, 2g

2 tbsp wheat germ, 4g

 

Rice:

1/2 cup cooked white 2g

cooked brown, 2.5

 

Nuts and seeds:

30g almonds, 6g

30g cashews, 5g

1 tbsp peanut butter, 7.5

15-20 walnut halves, 7g

1 tbsp sesame seeds, 2.5g

30g sunflower, 6.5

1 tbsp tahini, 3.5g

 

Fruit:

1/2 avacado, 2.5g

3 dried figs, 2g

5 dates, 0.7g

 

Vegies:

100g cooked beans, 7g

1/2 cup baked beans, 7g

1 cup mung beans, 3g

2 florretts of brocolli, 2g

30g cooked lentils, 2.7g

100g raw spinach, 2.4g

100g mixed vegies, 1.4g

1/2 cup soy beans, 12g

150g raw firm tofu, 10g

 

Others:

1 tbsp brewers yeast dry, 5g

100ml mature breast milk, 1.1g LOL

 

will give those requested ones when i get time

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although its not a vegie, i like having turkey and roo for something different, its lean and good protein content

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I remember reading an execellent article on vegetarian bodybuilding once.

 

They were basically talking about the "amino acid spectrum", different beans and legumes are skewed differently across the spectrum, so you always have to combine at least 2 types of beans in each meal in order to get a complete spectrum in order to grow.

 

It is possible, if you do know what you're doing. Andreas Carhling used to write regular articles on diet for vegetarians, if you have to go that way.

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i know this is a veg thread but i thought if i just post good protein sources then everyone can read and has somewhere to come back to for info. ill post vegie stuff later, busy as shit this week.

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Im a vegie too... I've been told mushies, potatos (with the skin on), lentils & soy

 

I also substitue one of my daily meals with a good old protein shake. It heaped me heaps, boosted my energy & im toning quite nicely. Im finding it easier and quicker to get strong too.

 

my protein powder is by HORLEYS and is called "Sculpt". its got 30g of protein with low fat milk. Its loaded with vitamins aswell. This one is for us girlies but im sure if u go into a health food store and give em a low down on what u want they can recommend you something for ur needs.

 

Its helped me heaps.. cant hurt to try.

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lol im not a vegetarian, i only was asking because i want to make sure im eating the right vegies along side my steak and chicken :P

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You don't eat veges for protein. You eat them for clean carbs and vitamins/minerals. They are not complete proteins. You have to mix and match to make it work.

 

You need to understand how proteins work. Just because it's a protein, doesn't mean it's as effective as other protein sources. For a protein to be complete, it must contain all of the essential amino acids. Vege's are incomplete, they don't contain all the essential AA's. Dairy, meat and fish are complete proteins. That's why they should be the staple of your protein intake.

If you do some research you can find out how to mix and match veggies to form a complete protein. Some veg have certain aa's, other have certain aa's, and when mixed together they form a complete protein.

 

I would just stick to the basics for protein, and as i said, eat veges for the carbs, minerals and vitamins.

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theres 5 food groups for a reason fellaz.. ;)

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As simon said, meats are complete protein sources, so if you are a vegetarian you need to know what to combine in order to get the most out of it. The problem with most vegatarian diets is that they dont know how to eat, they just avoid meat which is no good for you. vegetarian diets are easily the best for you, if you know what to eat and where to get your protein. i gotta run, cause i have a class, ill extend later.

 

This is from Andreas Cahling, vegatarian bodybuilder:

 

One of the staples of my diet is grilled cheese sandwhiches. I take one piece of heavy whole grain bread, slap on a thick slice of raw goats cheese. Then i lightly toast this in the oven to melt the cheese. I might eat 4 or 5 of these open face sandwhiches a day.

Salads- especially those with alot of sprouts, mushrooms and tomatoes with no dressing. A medium sized bowl is a gastrointestinal delight and you wont miss the dressing.

I also eat a few nuts, some fruit, freshly squeezed fruit juice and vegatable juices, and perhaps have some sunflower and pumpkin seeds during the day. Juices are very cleansing, especially green juices like celery, parsley and spinach.

Because of my fresh and natural diet, i dont seem t ned many ood supplements. Just before a contest i'll take low-potency nautral vitamins and minerals.

 

Bill Pearl:

 

I dont presume to tell lact-vegatarians what to eat. I can only tell you how i eat, and you can take it from there. When i get up at 3:45 am- i might have a cup of mint tea as a perker-upperer. Once back home from the gym, i might have a cheese ommelette or 5 or 6 eggs prepared in another way. I might also have a little cottage cheese, some heavy type of bran bread with butter, and another cup of tea.

For lunch ill have a large fresh salad, putting the widest possible variety of ingredients into it. I might only use a little bit of olive oil and vinegar as dressing.

At night my wife will cook up some souffle', or perhaps a casserole. I'll have another fresh salad and for dessert maybe some yoghurt or fruit.

 

that was taken from Gold's Gym Nutrition Bible.

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Sources of protein

 

Meat:

180g raw rump steak lean only grilled, 33g

110g grilled lean only blade steak, 32g

 

 

Think you meant 100g of rump steak, 180g of steak has at least 50g of protein. Steak has a minimum of 28% protein

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depends on the source of the meat dude, my clinical nutrition textbook says 180g steak. although its primarily an american text, the differences will be minimal

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My sources state 51g protein for a 180g steak.

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ditch the veggies and hit up some kangaroo, now thats the shit! :D

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I used to get kangaroo for $3-5/kg for the cats before it was legal, how much is it now ? rip off last time I looked.

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almost the same as a regular rump steak.

 

I buy it ever now and then just to mix things up, but not that often coz its pretty gamey

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it smells funny.. but if u dont cook it for too long, its quite nice!

 

its quite cheap too.. much cheaper than steak.. buy the pre marinated one, thats goood!

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yeah i'm hooked on the kanga bangas. its a nice big protein hit and almost no saturated fat. nice healthy option

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You don't eat veges for protein. You eat them for clean carbs and vitamins/minerals. They are not complete proteins. You have to mix and match to make it work.

 

You need to understand how proteins work. Just because it's a protein, doesn't mean it's as effective as other protein sources. For a protein to be complete, it must contain all of the essential amino acids. Vege's are incomplete, they don't contain all the essential AA's. Dairy, meat and fish are complete proteins. That's why they should be the staple of your protein intake.

If you do some research you can find out how to mix and match veggies to form a complete protein. Some veg have certain aa's, other have certain aa's, and when mixed together they form a complete protein.

Haha. The body requires 23 amino acids, in which 8 can't be made in the body. Some plants contain all 8, others a few.

http://thevegandiet.blogspot.com/search/label/amino%20acids

There are 8 amino acids which the human body cannot manufacture out of a total of 23 amino acids. In many circles it is thought that these 8 essential amino acids are only available from animal protein. This is false as all 8 are available from a plant based diet. Some plant foods contain all 8 and others a few.

 

Foods which do contain all 8 amino acids are bananas, tomatoes, dates, carrots, corn and most nuts. Combine foods in a meal to do the same.

 

 

Tryptophan, necessary for the body to produce niacin, which helps the body produce serotonin, that acts as a calming agent in the brain, reduces aggressive behavior, assists in sleep and regulates appetite. Found in mushrooms, spinach, raw tofu, buckwheat, most nuts, bananas, mustard greens, asparagus and many other veggies.

 

Lysine, necessry for calcium absorption, growth and bone development in children and aids in the production of hormones, enzymes and antibodies. Also with iron and vitamin C involved in collagen formation. Found in beans, potatoes, brewer's yeast, tomatoes, pumpkin and other veggies.

Methionine, necessary for the formation of blood proteins, globulins, and albumins. Is an antioxident and helps with the breakdown of fats. Found in beans, garlic, lentils, soybeans, onions, seeds, nuts, bananas and many vegetables.

 

Isoleucine, necessary for infant growth, nitrogen balance in adults and regulating blood sugar and energy levels. Found in chickpeas, lentils, almonds, cashews, rye, seeds, soy protein, bananas, avocado and many veggies.

 

Leucine, helps with the regulation of blood-sugar levels and it assists in the growth and repair of bones, muscle tissue and skin.

Found in corn, brown rice, beans, nuts, soy flour, whole wheat and many veggies.

 

Phenylalanine, necessary for brain functions like memory and learning, is a mood enhancer and controls obesity. Found in almonds, avocados, beans, peanuts, bananas, tomatoes, seeds and many veggies.

 

Threonine necessary for maintaining protein balance in the body and is important in the formation of collagen and elastin. Found in wheat germ, nuts, beans, papaya, banana and some vegetables.

 

Valine, necessary for better muscle metabolism, tissue repair, and nitrogen balance. Found in grains, mushrooms, peanuts, almonds, soy protein and root vegetables.

Edited by eron

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Sorry mate but that is wrong.

 

There are 9 essential amino acids, not 8. You are missing histidine, which has lately been accepted as an essential amino acid.

Most vegetables bar soy beans are incomplete

 

Remember it's not just the presence of the amino acids but the ratio's aswell

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sorry dude, simons right, theres 9.

and vegetables ARE an incomplete source. you need to combine plant foods to get complete AA's.

we see alot of vegetarians in clinic with nutritional deficiencies because people dont know how to plan a diet.

 

"Amino Acids: The chemical components or building blocks of protein, which the body requires for growth, maintenance, repair and the manufacture of various hormones, antibodies and enzymes. There are twentyone amino acids in all, nine of which are essential, meaning the body cannot synthesize them in sufficient quantities to satisfy the nutritional requirements for good health, and therefore must be included in the diet. The nine essential amino acids are: histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan and valine."

Source: The Nutrition Bible. 1995.

 

"The really difficult challenge in providing adequate protein is found in planning strict vegetarian diets. Vegetarians who eliminate milk and its products, eggs, all flesh type products, need to plan to insure a mixture of protein sources (legumes and cereals, legumes and nuts, cereals and nuts, or all three cattegories of protein foods) at each meal so that complementary proteins are available as needed for protein synthesis.

A variety of plant proteins can be combined to meet the protein need, however the bulkinessof such quantities required may be discouraging to some people."

Source: Living Nutrition. 1984

 

edit:

as for protein in beef, rump steak, 180g, grilled lean contains 58.5g according to calorieking.com.au which is a site devoted to nutritional values of australian foods.

my bad, my text book was incorrect on this occassion. possibly american cattle are not of as good quality as our own, or it is possibly because it was a clinical textbook it understated the protein values. who knows. either way, i was wrong. thanks

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Histidine: rice, wheat, and rye

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Histidine is found in fruits such as bananas and grapes, meat and poultry, and milk and milk products. It is also found in root vegetables and all green vegetables, though in lesser quantities.

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