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Warrior Training...Shamrock style

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Mini-Article: Warrior Training

by the editors

 

If you want to learn how to fight like a man, there's only one place to go: the world famous Lion's Den dojo. The Lion's Den was started by Ultimate Fighting Champion, pro-wrestler, and "world's most dangerous man" Ken Shamrock. The Lion's Den is home to some of the toughest men alive. No matter what you call it — Pankration, Vale Tudo, reality combat, no-holds-barred fighting, Pancrase hybrid wrestling — this is the place to go to learn the fine art of whup-ass.

 

The Lion's Den doesn't accept just anyone into its ranks. Those wanting to train with Shamrock first have to try out. During this grueling tryout, hopeful fighters are put through a series of bodyweight-only exercises. (Shamrock keeps plastic buckets handy during the tryouts. One guess what they're used for.) Those left standing at the end are put in the ring with the veterans who take turns testing the mettle of the wannabes, i.e., beating the shit out of them. Usually one guy is chosen to join the pride based on this final test.

 

It may surprise you that the world's leanest and meanest fighters follow a core workout of bodyweight exercises. Sure, Lion's Den fighters do bench presses, weighted squats, and curls (in fact, the clean and press is a favorite), but the majority of their training revolves around bodyweight exercises Shamrock picked up from his own tryout with the Japanese fighting circuit and his stint in the Marines. After several months of Lion's Den training, fighters are expected to be able to perform the following:

 

500 bodyweight squats

100 push-ups

100 crunches

20 chin-ups

 

The really advanced warriors can do all these exercises without rest. Ouch. Pass the bucket.

 

Take It Like A Man

 

There are several reasons why you may want to incorporate some of these exercises into your current program. First off, this is real-man cardio, not that pussified form of aerobic training you get from treadmills and elliptical riders. You really want to be in there with the rest of the goofballs riding bikes that aren't going anywhere? Instead of the usual stuff, use this type of training as part of your next fat-loss program.

 

Second, this is the perfect type of training to do if you're stuck in a hotel room or are snowed in and can't make it to the gym. Don't believe us? Try it and see how your legs feel the next day. Lastly, think of this as a test of mental toughness. Can you take the pain? Can you keep going when every fiber in your body is screaming for you to stop? Try it and find out.

 

Keep in mind, though, that these high-rep bodyweight workouts aren't the best thing for building muscle, if that's your only goal. The intensity is too low and the reps are too high.

 

The Exercises

 

The Bodyweight Squat: This is the core of the submission fighter's training. Shamrock says that strong legs are the foundation of fighting and squats are the ultimate test of a man's heart and lungs. While Shamrock never mentions speed of movement in his book Inside the Lion's Den, most tend to use a fairly fast tempo, something like 101. (That's one second to squat down, no pause, and one second to come back up.)

 

Keep your feet about shoulder width apart, maybe a little wider. Some prefer to keep their hands down at their sides while others prefer to hold their arms out in front of them for balance. Squat down to just below parallel and come back up to near lockout.

 

 

 

The Push-up: You probably don't need much of an explanation here. Go down until your nose or chest brushes the ground and come back up. Again, the tempo is fairly fast, around 101.

 

 

 

The Crunch: Shamrock notes that the abdomen is like the hinge between your upper and lower body. No matter how strong your gate is, if your hinge is weak you won't last long in the octagon. While Shamrock prefers to do these in more of a sit-up fashion with a partner holding his feet, you can do them solo just as easily using crunch form. He has his fighters use a slower tempo here, exhaling every rep.

 

 

 

Progressions and Options

 

After ten bodyweight squats you may be laughing about how easy this is. After 50, you may be tempted to take a little breather. After 100, you may need to sit down. Most men never make it to 300. Shamrock says you should shoot for 500 if you're a real warrior. Now, before you get discouraged here, he also says that you should start with sets of 25 or 50, then "build, build, build." We'd say a good goal the first time you try this would be:

 

100 squats

20 push-ups

20 crunches

 

If you can, try not to rest between exercises. If you have access to a chin-up bar, you may try to knock out 10 chins as well. The next time, try to add numbers to each exercise. If you can eventually hit 500 squats, 100 push-ups, and 100 crunches, then you are an official bad-ass mutha!

 

Another option is to forget about counting reps and shoot for time. Get an egg timer or a Timex Ironman watch and simply squat for five minutes; then do push-ups for two minutes; and crunches for another two. Then do the whole circuit again if you're up for it. Being an official bad-ass mutha himself (and perhaps their leader), Shamrock sometimes watches the clock and squats for a full 30 minutes without stopping. We say five or ten minutes would be a good place to start for mere mortals.

 

The last option is to use a variation of the rest/pause method. For example, set yourself a goal of doing 200 bodyweight squats. Do as many as you can, rest for a few seconds, then do some more. Keep this up until you reach your target number. If it takes six sets, fine. The next time try to do it in five.

 

That's it. No more excuses when you can't make it to the gym. Now go see what you're made of.

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My gym closes for 8 days around christmas - new year, looks like i'll be giving these a go.

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Actually there's alot of good information there. I'm waiting on getting a gym at home set up (car's stealing weight and equipment finances) so I'll do these in the mean time.

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This post doesn't seem right coming from you m&m. This goes against everything you say. You want people to do more than 5 reps? lol. It actually wouldn't take very long to hit these figures. From my experience it's much easier to get endurance to those levels than get genuinely strong.

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This post doesn't seem right coming from you m&m. This goes against everything you say. You want people to do more than 5 reps? lol. It actually wouldn't take very long to hit these figures. From my experience it's much easier to get endurance to those levels than get genuinely strong.

Agreed. I could do it right now if someone put $50 on the table, cos that's the sort of motivation I'd need for summing this sorta concentration :lol:

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just cos he posted it, doesnt mean he totally agrees with it.

 

just some reading on a different technique, was a good read if you ask me.

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500 bodyweight doesnt really SOUND like much..... BUT in reality... i jus did some for fun - 70reps, started feeling it, 500 would be TOUGH!

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I was joking MR 180. Don't get me wrong it is still tough but much easier to get to those levels then being genuinly strong. The only tough one is the squats.

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All training has some benefits,its just that some are better than others.You can bet your house that Ken Shamrock did not build his physique doing this workout.

 

Ghosty I will bet you whatever you like you could not do that workout without a rest.Thats 500 squats without stopping and so on.How do I know this....................you cant do 20 chins lol lol.

 

How much would that suck,getting through all that without stopping,and not being able to do 20 chins.

 

Ghosty,DO NOT DO THIS WORKOUT

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hahahaha tru, how gay it would be too come so close, yet be so far, off by 10 chins....:lol:

 

 

I HATE endurance work, (but I'm good at it), but yeah, these days I need a very very good reason to undertake any sort enurance work lol....even when it comes to the bedroom, sure I could keep it going for 30mins to an hour no pause, but what for? lol, that's the beauty of one night stands turned quickie, you're not around to be judged by her when the time comes :lol: :lol: :lol:

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I heard your nickname was noodles....you know,the chick puts the 2 minute noodles in the microwave when you start and both you and the microwave go off together

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I heard your nickname was noodles....you know,the chick puts the 2 minute noodles in the microwave when you start and both you and the microwave go off together

narh they don't make 30 second noodles............ha :rolleyes:

 

(I'm a funny guy)

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Shamrock is an idiot. He belives you can't train power. He is a damn good fighter though and f**ken strong, just not too heavy on the brains.

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Shamrock is 100% correct.A powerful athlete is born,not made.You can improve your power,but you will never become Pyrros Dymas or Ben Johnson.

 

Your fast twich/slow twitch ratio is determined at birth.

 

I suppose you could choose your parents more wisely next time.

 

If you dont believe me,go and test your standing broad jump.Do powercleans and snatches for 5 years.See if you can hit 12',thats what the top flight Olympic lifters hit.Not going to happen.

 

Shamrock isnt as dumb as you think.

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He was talking about striking power, which most comes from technique not raw power which you are talking about. I should have clarified that earlier. Still practice power cleans and what happens you can power clean more. Actually I believe you can train to jump high as well. Training only goes as far as genetics will take you so no you can't jump as high as an olympic athelete by you can optimise your own abilities. So I don't agree with you there either. Perhaps your optimal power is determined at birth but getting the most out of your body requires training.

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My wife trains as hard as anybody I know.Her weakness has always been power,not strength.We have worked on her weakness forever.The bar moves at the same speed when she benches 50kg or 67.5kg.You cant train power....period.The improvement you can make is miniscule.

 

But you can improve strength,by massive quantities.

 

The only guy on here who powercleans 100kg is Adam.Olympic weightlifters in his weightclass clean well over 200kg.If Adam ever cleans 120kg,he will be the strongest cleaner I have met in 30 years of lifting.He will not powerclean 120kg for a very long time,if ever,he simply doesnt posses enough fast twitch fibers.Any improvement he makes will be via strength gains,not power.

 

You cant train power.There is a world of difference between power and strength.Its why at Westside they have a piece of equipment that measures bar speed,its how they determine who stays and who goes.Limited spots available,they chase world champions.

 

When someone lifts at my gym,the only thing besides technique I look at is bar speed.If you recall Benny was training at my gym.In 7 weeks of training,at age 29,having never ever trained before,he cleaned 105kg,deadlifted 200kg and squatted 145kg.He moves the bar as fast as anyone I have seen.How many others could do this after 7 weeks of training,put your hand up.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anyone.

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well this is the formula

 

power = strength x speed

 

So by working on your strength alone, you are increasing your power. By working on your speed alone, you are increasing your power.

By doing both, you are greatly increasing your power.

 

The reason why m&m said you can't train power effectively, is that most strong people can't lift the weight fast. So to concentrate on lifting the weight fast, you have to drop the weight, reducing the power. It will take a while to get back to the initial strength with the added speed to increase the power.

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We are talking different things. Striking is very technical. I'm talking about how hard you can punch is how effective you can put your weight into the strike x speed. Training may not make you hit harder than mike tyson but that is because he trains too and puts his weight into punch as well plus superior genetics. But superior genetics with no technique equals average power. Mike Tysons training definately makes him hit harder though. That is why he spends so much time training it.

 

It is like golf a little scrawny guy may be able to hit the ball much further than ben johnson. Now in theory ben johnson may have potential to hit the golf ball further but his inferior technique outweighs superior genetics.

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power = strength x speed

 

If your equation is correct then increase strength speed stays constant and then power increases. The thing is even speed in striking is related to technique,. Most people are two stiff and they punch real slow. The muscle is fighting against itself. They feel powerfull but they are weak. You need to be relaxed to be fast.

 

I actually just read the article posted by ben johnson's coach and he was talking about running technique and how it affects power being transfered to the ground. Same principal. Genetics plus technique = fast. Since you can't cange your genetics work on your technique

 

Speaking of genetics did you guys catch this one in off topic

 

http://www.nissansilvia.com/forums/index.p...howtopic=238268

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Okay,this is probably the easiest way I can explain it.I'm using your original comment of you cant train power,you have now bought technique and other variables in.

 

For arguments sake,Vince Carter has a fast/slow twitch split of 80% fast and 20% slow twitch fibers.You have a 50/50 split.Vince has a vertical of 42" (f**king amazing) and yours is 20".You go away and train your fast twitch fibers and make them twice as strong,your clean goes from 50kg to 100kg.So in turn,your vertical goes from 20" to an amazing 30".

 

But here is the sad truth.Vince didnt jump higher than you (and everyone else) because his fast twitch fibers were stronger,he jumped higher because he has more of them,a fact we can NEVER change.That is what Ken Shamrock is talking about.He is an elite athlete.He is not talking about improving yourself.

 

You cannot train power.Powerful athletes are born,not made.Everyone can improve,by making their fast twitch fibers stronger,but the power athletes are better than us because they have more,not because they are stronger.

 

Gary Ablett snr is easily the most powerful athlete to ever play football.He did things that were so explosive opponents just scratched their heads.

 

The one piece of advice he gave Gary jnr,and I will never ever forget this.....stay away from the weights son,they just slow you down.

 

Now we all know he is wrong,but what amazed me was that Gary NEVER lifted weights,he was born that way,while others bust their ass in the gym trying to emulate him,he just used gods gifts to astound the football world.

 

You cant train power.

 

I just think we have a different view on what power is,like I said,I watch bar speed when I watch someone lift,best way to assess their potential.

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gave it a bitof a go last night, the workout thing, but could get no way near it.

ended up doing

 

3 sets of 60 squats

3 sets of 20 pushups

3 sets of 20 crunches

 

had nothing to do chins on.

 

would go squats then straight to pushups, rest 10 secs then crunches the n rest for 1 mintue then started routine again

and wow was i feeling it after that, this morning thighs were a little sore but not to bad

 

a lot of training needed to get to the 500 squats.

even the small amount i did is still a good workout anyway,

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I think you have to get the squats out of the way before moving on to the next movement.Imagine doing ALL of them without a break,serious work

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I personally reckon the squats are the easiest bit, that's where you can rest while doing them, but 100 pushups is a fkn mission, 100 crunches is easy (waits for simon to chime in :rolleyes:) and 20 pullups would be very very hard, especially if you didn't have enough time to rest from the pushups whilst doing crunches, even tho it's different part of your arm it still takes it's toll heavily. That's my 2c anyway.

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I want someone on here to do these easy 500 continuous full squats

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i dont know about easy lol.

 

after 3 months off and not doing a single squat

 

8 minutes and 160 full squats non stop.

then my legs gave way and i collapsed!

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I'd give it ago but then I would have to miss a squat session and that would piss me off.

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My wife wants to give it a go.She will give the squats a good show,I know she can do well over 50 pushups,but has never gone to failure,100 crunches are the easiest of the lot,but sadly,she is 5 chins short.

 

Weak bitch.

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My wife wants to give it a go.She will give the squats a good show,I know she can do well over 50 pushups,but has never gone to failure,100 crunches are the easiest of the lot,but sadly,she is 5 chins short.

 

Weak bitch.

 

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

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Did this last night i got the following sets out

 

500 bodyweight squats 150,150,100,100,

100 push-ups 75,25

100 crunches 100

20 chin-ups 20

 

started with 20 heaves in 1 set then strait to 100 crunches then did 150 squats (hurt a fair bit) then did 75 pushups then keep on going betwen squats and pushups. when i ran out of pushups to do i just walked around for about 20secs then back to it. Hurt like hell whilst doing but felt good today.

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