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Here is a good article i came across. As a once strong opposer of pre-breakfast cardio, it has opened my eyes up ALOT more.

 

 

"Even though morning cardio has been embraced by bodybuilders as a "tried and true" fat loss technique, there is definitely not a unanimous agreement about its effectiveness, especially in the scientific community. Most competitive bodybuilders are die-hard advocates of doing cardio first thing in the morning before eating their first meal. They believe it will cause them to mobilize more stored body fat and increase their metabolic rate all day long. There's quite a bit of scientific literature supporting the a.m. fasted cardio theory, but generally, the exercise physiologists and scientists tend not to buy it. They subscribe to the energy balance hypothesis, which states; as long as you burn more calories than you consume in each 24 hour period, then the time of day you burn them doesn't matter, nor does whether you burn them from fat or carbohydrate.

 

If you have even the most rudimentary understanding of human physiology and physics, you have to concede that the timing of your cardio is not the most important factor in fat loss. When you do your cardio won't make or break you. Simply doing it whenever it's convenient and following a mildly calorie restricted diet is what's important. However, there's a very strong case for doing fasted a.m. cardio and if you want to gain every legal and ethical advantage possible in your quest to get leaner then it's definitely something you should take a closer look at.

 

The argument in favor of fasted early morning cardio goes something like this:

 

1. When you wake up in the morning after an overnight 8-12 hour fast, your body's stores of glycogen are somewhat depleted. Doing cardio in this state causes your body to mobilize more fat because of the unavailability of glycogen.

 

2. Eating causes a release of insulin. Insulin interferes with the mobilization of body fat. Less insulin is present in the morning; therefore, more body fat is burned when cardio is done in the morning.

 

3. There is less carbohydrate (glucose) "floating around" in the bloodstream when you wake up after an overnight fast. With less glucose available, you will burn more fat.

 

4. If you eat immediately before a workout, you have to burn off what you just ate first before tapping into stored body fat (and insulin is elevated after a meal.)

 

5. When you do cardio in the morning, your metabolism stays elevated for a period of time after the workout is over. If you do cardio in the evening, you burn calories during the session so you definitely benefit from it, but you fail to take advantage of the "afterburn" effect because your metabolic rate drops dramatically as soon as you go to sleep.

 

Research supports this theory. A study performed at Kansas State University and published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise showed that a kilogram of fat is burned sooner when exercise is done in the fasted state in the morning than when it's done later in the day. The researchers measured respiratory gas exchange, caloric expenditure and carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism, and found that the amount of fat burned during aerobic exercise amounted to 67% of the total energy expenditure in the morning after a 12 hour fast. This is substantially higher than the 50% expenditure achieved when the same exercise was done later in the day or after eating. A similar study from The Journal of Applied Physiology looked at the effects of aerobic exercise on lipid oxidation in fed versus fasted states. The researchers concluded, "our results support the hypothesis that endurance training enhances lipid oxidation in men after a 12 hour overnight fast." Yet another scientific paper, Optimizing Exercise for Fat Loss," reports, "The ability of exercise to selectively promote fat oxidation should be optimized if exercise is done during morning fasted metabolism."

 

Despite the fact that increased fat burning from morning aerobics seems logical and is backed by research, the majority of scientists and exercise physiologists vehemently deny its effectiveness. They are quick to point out that you can find a study to support almost any theory you want to advocate. Interestingly though, even the most dyed in the wool academics agree that you'll burn more fat in the fuel mix as compared to sugars. The real controversy lies in whether this fact has any impact on overall fat loss in the long run.

 

Exercise Physiologist Greg Landry, MS, author of "The Metabolism System for Weight Loss and Fitness," explains, "I agree that you burn a fuel mix that is a little higher in fat if you're exercising on an empty stomach. However, I think the real question is, does that matter? I believe we have a 'pool' of calories stored in different forms in the body (fat, glycogen, etc.), so 'burned' calories all come from the same pool. Thus, it really doesn't matter that the fuel mix has a little more fat in it at a given time. If it's pulling from fat stores at that time, then it's pulling less from glycogen stores and thus future consumed calories will be a little more likely to be stored as fat because glycogen stores are a little fuller. So it's all a wash."

 

Lyle McDonald, an expert on bodybuilding nutrition and author of "The Ketogenic Diet," agrees. He argues that the body will compensate later in the day and is simply "too smart" for strategies like this to ever work: "All that research says is that you burn a greater proportion of fat this way, which I agree with 100%," says Lyle. "The majority of research shows that as far as real world fat loss goes, it doesn't really matter what you burn. Rather, 24-hour calorie balance is what matters. Because if you burn glucose during exercise, you tend to burn more fat the rest of the day. If you burn fat during exercise, you burn more glucose during the day. The end result is identical. If that weren't the case, then athletes like sprinters who never 'burn fat' during exercise wouldn't be shredded. Basically, they burn so many calories that they remain in balance and don't gain any fat. So, while morning cardio probably provides some psychological benefits to bodybuilders who are programmed to do it that way, I can't say that I think it will result in greater 'real world' fat loss, which is what matters."

 

When it comes to "real world" fat loss, few people have more experience than Chris Aceto. A successful bodybuilder and nutritionist to some of the top pro bodybuilders in the world, Aceto is a firm believer in morning cardio. He unequivocally states, "The fastest way to tap stored body fat is to do cardio first thing in the morning on an empty stomach."

 

Aceto believes that looking at calories only in terms of energy in vs. energy out is "limited thinking." He asserts that there are more factors involved in "real world" results than just energy balance. This all comes back to the old argument, are all calories created equal? "Absolutely not!" Aceto declares. "A calorie is not just a calorie and exercise physiologists 'freak out' when they hear this."

 

"These guys are working from the assumption that it's just a matter of calories in vs. calories out, period," Chris continued. "With that line of reasoning, they'd be forced to say that if I consume nothing but candy bars and Coca-Cola, and take in 100 calories less than maintenance, I'd lose weight. We know it's not that simple. You also have to account for ratios of carbs, protein, and fat. Then there's meal frequency too: From real world results we know you put down more muscle mass from 5 or 6 meals a day than from 3 meals a day. There are more things involved than just calories."

 

Whether or not morning cardio in the fasted state increases "real world" fat loss is still the subject of controversy, but there are many other reasons you might want to consider making it a part of your daily routine. Landry, despite his doubts about whether the fuel source matters, admits, "If I had to pick a single factor I thought was most important in a successful weight loss program, it would have to be to exercise first thing in the morning."

 

Here are some of the additional benefits of doing cardio early in the morning:

 

1.It makes you feel great all day by releasing mood-enhancing endorphins.

 

2. It "energizes" you and "wakes you up."

 

3. It may help regulate your appetite for the rest of the day.

 

4. Your body's circadian rhythm adjusts to your morning routine, making it easier to wake up at the same time every day.

 

5. You'll be less likely to "blow off" your workout when it's out of the way early (like when you're exhausted after work or when friends ask you to join them at the pub for happy hour).

 

6. You can always "make time" for exercise by setting your alarm earlier in the morning.

 

7. It increases your metabolic rate for hours after the session is over.

 

Of all these benefits, the post-exercise increase in your metabolic rate is one of the most talked about. Scientists call this "afterburn" effect the "excess post-exercise oxygen consumption" or EPOC for short.

 

Looking only at the number of calories and the type of calories burned during the session doesn't give you the full picture. You also need to look at the increased number of calories you continue to burn after the workout is over. That's right - work out in the morning and you burn calories all day long. Imagine burning extra fat as you sit at your desk at work! That's the good news. The bad news is, the degree of EPOC is not as great as most people think. It's a myth that your metabolism stays elevated for 24 hours after a regular aerobic workout. That only happens after extremely intense and/or prolonged exercise such as running a marathon.

 

After low intensity exercise, the magnitude of the EPOC is so small that its impact on fat loss is negligible. Somewhere between 9 and 30 extra calories are burned after exercise at an intensity of less than 60-65% of maximal heart rate. In other words, a casual stroll on the treadmill will do next to nothing to increase your metabolism.

 

However, EPOC does increase with the intensity (and duration) of the exercise. According to Wilmore and Costill in "Physiology of Sport and Exercise," the EPOC after moderate exercise (75-80%) will amount to approximately .25 kcal/min or 15 kcal/hour. This would provide an additional expenditure of 75 kcal that would not normally be calculated in the total energy expended for that activity. An extra 75 calories is definitely nothing Earth shattering. However, it does add up over time. In a year that would mean (in theory) you would burn an extra 5.2 lbs of fat from the additional calories expended after the workout.

 

One way to get a significant post exercise "afterburn" is high intensity interval training (HIIT). HIIT is done by alternating brief periods of high intensity work (85% or more) with brief periods of lower intensity work. Studies on the effects of HIIT have demonstrated a much higher EPOC, which can add substantially to the day's calorie expenditure. In one study, scientists from the University of Alabama compared the effects of two exercise protocols on 24-hour energy expenditure. The first group cycled for 60 minutes at a moderate intensity. The second group performed HIIT, cycling for two minutes at high intensity followed by two minutes at a low intensity. The group that performed the HIIT burned 160 more calories in 24 hours than the low intensity group. That means the HIIT group would burn an extra 11.8 pounds of fat in one year if they did HIIT five days a week instead of conventional training.

 

Ironically, weight training has a much higher magnitude of EPOC than aerobic training. Studies have shown increases in metabolic rate of as much as 4-7% over a 24-hour period from resistance training. Yes - that means bodybuilding does burn fat - albeit through an indirect mechanism. For someone with an expenditure of 2500 calories per day, that could add up to 100 - 175 extra calories burned after your weight training workout is over. The lesson is simple: Anyone interested in losing body fat who is not lifting weights should first take up a regimen of bodybuilding, then - and only then - start thinking about the morning cardio!

 

A common concern about doing cardio in the fasted state, especially if it's done with high intensity, is the possibility of losing muscle. After an overnight fast, glycogen, blood glucose and insulin are all low. As we've already concluded, this is an optimum environment for burning fat. Unfortunately, it may also be an optimum environment for burning muscle because carbohydrate fuel sources are low and levels of the catabolic stress hormone cortisol are high. It sounds like morning cardio might be a double-edged sword, but there are ways to avert muscle loss.

 

All aerobic exercise will have some effect on building muscle, but as long as you don't overdo it, you shouldn't worry about losing muscle. It's a fact that muscle proteins are broken down and used for energy during aerobic exercise. But you are constantly breaking down and re-building muscle tissue anyway. This process is called "protein turnover" and it's a daily fact of life. Your goal is to tip the scales slightly in favor of increasing the anabolic side and reducing the catabolic side just enough so you stay anabolic and you gain or at least maintain muscle.

 

How do you build up more muscle than you break down? First, avoid excessive cardio. Aceto suggests limiting your cardio on an empty stomach to 30 minutes, and then it would be "highly unlikely that amino acids will be burned as fuel." He also mentions that "a strong cup of coffee should facilitate a shifting to burn more fat and less glycogen. If you can spare glycogen, you'll ultimately spare protein too." You might also want to consider experimenting with the thermogenic ephedrine-caffeine-aspirin stack (or it's herbal equivalent).

 

Second, give your body the proper nutritional support. Losing muscle probably has more to do with inadequate nutrition than with excessive aerobics. Provide yourself with the proper nutritional support for the rest of the day, including adequate meal frequency, protein, carbohydrates and total calories, and it's not as likely that there will be a net loss of muscle tissue over each 24-hour period.

 

Third, keep training with heavy weights, even during a fat loss phase. Using light weights and higher reps thinking that it will help you get more "cut" is a mistake: What put the muscle on in the first place is likely to help you keep it there.

 

Still petrified of losing your hard-earned muscle, but you'd like to take advantage of the fat-burning and metabolism-boosting effects of morning cardio? One strategy many bodybuilders use is to drink a protein shake or eat a protein only meal 30-60 minutes prior to the morning session. The protein without the carbs will minimize the insulin response and allow you to mobilize fat while providing amino acids to prevent muscle breakdown.

 

In conclusion, it seems that morning cardio has enough indisputable benefits to motivate most people to set their alarms early. But let's talk bottom line results here: Does it really result in more "real world fat loss" than aerobics performed at other times of the day or after eating? I have to believe it does. Experience, common sense and research all tell me so. Nevertheless, this will obviously continue to be an area of much debate, and clearly, more research is needed. In the meantime, while the scientists are busy in their labs measuring respiratory exchange ratios, caloric expenditures and rates of substrate utilization, I'm going to keep waking up at 6:00 AM every morning to get on my Stairmaster. "

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fukn hell 3.7% bodyfat is crazy

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very interesting read, while it poses some good points, not enough concrete evidence for me to set my alarm at 6:00, rather do my runs when i get home after work...

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yep agree.

i have always known cardio in the morning is better coz you get hte effect of elevated metabolism for hte whole day but getting up at 6am???? cant do it. i struggle to get up at 7:30 or 8 and ill be in bed by 10:00

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By doing it first thing in the morning without energy, wouldnt you burn muscle as well as fat?

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fk running full stop :lol:

 

my bmx is much more fun :P don't think i'v ever 'trained' cardio. just a result of having a good time :D

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i run afterwork on weekdays, but on the weekned its first thing in the morning, really just sets you up for the day!

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By doing it first thing in the morning without energy, wouldnt you burn muscle as well as fat?

 

Um did you even read the article?

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While running is catabolic, the author has a solution, its something Nina always did when she ran.Have a protein drink first.

 

Fact is, she is harder,stronger, lighter and leaner since giving up cardio. She would have to be the HARDEST person in the world to convince that cardio is bad, she has been doing it since the mid 80's.

 

She is now a believer, lift for muscle, diet for fat loss. I feel cardio is a band aid for bad nutrition habits for most.

 

Having said that, everyone will respond differently. Nina has found what works for her, took her 20 years, everyone should find what works for them.

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When I stopped playing rugby, I set myself a goal to do a half ironman, which is obviously fairly catabolic. I used to feel great after riding to work, which was roughly 45 minutes, I'd ride to the gym, and then go for an hour run on the treadmill or train upperbody.

I honestly believe that if you don't care what you look like or don't want to gain muscle, cardio first thing in the morning is a great way t start the day...

I do no cardio at all by the way, just diet, lost 8 kilos in the last 8 weeks

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By doing it first thing in the morning without energy, wouldnt you burn muscle as well as fat?

 

Um did you even read the article?

f**king LOL

 

and good read.

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'Losing muscle probably has more to do with inadequate nutrition than with excessive aerobics'

 

Oh yeah real convincing :S

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First, avoid excessive cardio. Aceto suggests limiting your cardio on an empty stomach to 30 minutes, and then it would be "highly unlikely that amino acids will be burned as fuel." He also mentions that "a strong cup of coffee should facilitate a shifting to burn more fat and less glycogen. If you can spare glycogen, you'll ultimately spare protein too."

 

Provide yourself with the proper nutritional support for the rest of the day, including adequate meal frequency, protein, carbohydrates and total calories, and it's not as likely that there will be a net loss of muscle tissue over each 24-hour period.

 

 

still petrified of losing your hard-earned muscle, but you'd like to take advantage of the fat-burning and metabolism-boosting effects of morning cardio? One strategy many bodybuilders use is to drink a protein shake or eat a protein only meal 30-60 minutes prior to the morning session. The protein without the carbs will minimize the insulin response and allow you to mobilize fat while providing amino acids to prevent muscle breakdown.

 

Yup, all in the article

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I did read the article, but am not convinced, i always drink a protein drink before cardio, as i dont believe with no fuel in your system that your body will burn 100% fat without muscle.

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I did read the article, but am not convinced, i always drink a protein drink before cardio, as i dont believe with no fuel in your system that your body will burn 100% fat without muscle.

 

It's not meant to convince you to change your ways, it's just an eye opener on some different opinions carried around.

 

Your body won't burn 100% fat anyway. There's a little thing called carbohydrates.

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I heard that you burn "twice" as much fat by doing cardio first thing in the morning before brekky.

 

I've tried it, it works, however I don't do it, if I'm sore from a heavy weight session the night before.

 

You risk injury while training in this state however, and you can't train as hard as normal, so you have to keep the cardio nice and simple, like cardio machine or medium paced jogging with careful steps. Just for fat burning, pre-brekky training is great IMO. If you want to increase your aerobic capacity or do heavy weights you'll perform alot better if you train later in the day when you've had a chance to digest your food.

 

Yeah, calorie balance will be the ultimate decider after all, but you definitely trim up the waistline quicker by doing the same cardio exercise pre-brekky. You can feel your metabolism running faster during the day if you train pre-brekky, it's obvious. Yeah so if you've got the time and motivation, you'll cut up quicker.

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I just do my cardio/ pilates and whatever else i want, in the morning coz its easy :ph34r: ???

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i read an article called 'the honey diet' before. basically includes taking two teaspoons of honey before bed hah...

 

i do it anyway! i'll find one of the articles, there is many about it.

 

"The strategy, developed by an Edinburgh pharmacist and sports nutritionist, is said to be used by champion boxer Alex Arthur and endorsed by Olympic gold-winning cyclist Chris Hoy.

 

The diet, hailed as the new Atkins, advises eating a couple of teaspoons of honey before bedtime and training with weights instead of gruelling aerobic workouts.

 

While Mike McInnes and his son Stuart were helping athletes with nutrition, they discovered that eating fructose-rich food such as honey, helped burn fat and increase stamina.

 

They also found that the best time to burn fat is while you are asleep - you burn more fat sleeping than doing anything else, including exercising.

 

When you eat fructose, it is converted to glucose in the liver. This stabilises blood sugar levels and allows the body to activate recovery hormones which rebuild muscle and skin cells.

 

These hormones are fuelled by fat, so rather than working to regulate blood sugar, when you eat honey before going to bed the body burns more fat.

 

Mr McInnes, who runs health shop Iso Active in South Clerk Street, said: "The key time for fat burning is in the first four hours of sleep when we go into slow-wave sleep.

 

"This switches on the pituitary gland and out of that comes a series of hormones that break down and use fat as fuel.

 

"Take your liver to bed empty, and your body can’t get to work with those hormones because it’s desperately trying to sort out your blood glucose levels.

 

"So stabilising your blood glucose at night by fuelling up your liver - honey is the key - allows that recovery to take place as it should.

 

"We also discovered that athletes who were using our liver fuelling strategy were reporting that their appetite was controlled much better."

 

A good night’s sleep is important to allow the hormones to get to work, so the diet advocates sleeping in total darkness, getting rid of electronic lights and thin curtains.

 

You can also increase the amount of fat you burn by doing what is known as resistance exercise.

 

But instead of having to spend hours on the treadmill and in aerobics classes, this can be done with 15-minute weights sessions three times a week, according to the diet.

 

With resistance work you stress a muscle, you damage it and then the body repairs it while you are sleeping by mobilising fat.

 

Unlike aerobic exercise, it only requires 15 minutes weight training a session to reap the benefits, Mr McInnes claims.

 

He is currently working on two books - one aimed at athletes and one which will detail the "Hibernation Diet".

 

Chris Hoy goes to Mr McInnes for nutrition advice and started using fructose drinks to increase his endurance.

 

He will endorse the sports book when it is published, while boxer Alex Arthur uses the liver-fuelling strategy to improve his stamina.

 

Mr McInnes believes low blood sugar led to Paula Radcliffe crashing out of the Olympic marathon - because she didn’t fuel up with fructose.

 

He said: "We know it’s revolutionary because we see the results we have had for athletes. It is a whole new approach as the liver is the organ that all the sports literature misses out. The sports establishment don’t like us because we are coming at it from an angle they haven’t thought of."

 

 

seems to talk sense to me. what do you think?

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well i thought. if it's right i get to eat honey and burn fat. if it's wrong i get to eat honey. win win so i don't care lol.

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seems to talk sense to me. what do you think?

There's a severe lack of evidence for my liking.

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why do you need evidence? it's simple. you take honey as it says, do 'resistance training' which you do. then you either loose fat or you don't.

 

honey isn't going to hurt you :lol:

 

 

he is not selling 'the honey diet'...

he does not market honey...

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Any crackpot can type up some bullshit article to get their name on a website. If i'm going to change from having slow release protein before bed then it's i'm going to want to see some damn good evidence why, especially if i'm changing to 100% sugar and giving myself a big insulin spike when my body doesn't need it. A person's blood sugar should be stable during the night anyway.

 

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The athletes mentioned in the article are endurance athletes.

 

From what I know, you probably couldnt eat anything worse than honey before bed if you are trying to gain muscle and burn fat, but I'm open to suggestions.

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it doesn't say cut out protein before bed?????? it says take 2 teaspoons of honey. not minus anything also. it's a very smple 'diet' i don't see a reason to complicate it.

 

you don't have to try it. for those that do will see results or they wont. persoanlly i see no harm in taking honey before bed.

from what the article says the idea behind this is to stabalise blood sugar levels anyway.

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Do you just blindly follow anything you read without investigating its validity? I found this article in the Cambodian Journal of Scientology:

 

Dr Neil Muscleman, an Afghani-trained Nutritionist and Alchemist, has developed his new diet, hailed by many to be a revelation to the world of bodybuilding.

 

The strategy, endorsed by famous sprinter Chinese strongman Nai Dontthinkso, is said to triple muscle gains while curing premature ejuculation syndrome. Dr Muscleman advises eating a diet consisting of 43% sugar, 2% protein and 69% fingernails. The kerotin contained within nails combined with the body's naturally produced haemoroids to boost vitality and penile smooth muscle bulk by up to 0.03%. Recent incidental studies show that gains may be doubled when combined with Creatine.

 

The product also turns fat to muscle in your sleep and brings veins to the surface for a more cut look.

 

Nai believes that these gains enable him to complete superhard and put in 110% effort. Many of his athletes have been training for less than 3 months and already winning Mongolian State Regional Division C Under 15 Championships for Teenagers with Gullibility.

 

He believes that the reason New Zealand suck at Rugby is because their diet contains insufficient amounts of fingernails.

 

Dr Muscleman sells his special blend of nails exclusively through his online website under the "Tough as Nails" brand for only $69 a gram.

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didn't win you anything with that post. bit of a difference.

 

see once again. instead of looking for figures you either try or dont try. unlike eating fingernails, 2 tea spoons of honey has no harsh effects.

 

plus he doesn't sell honey. not sure what the problem is? you either try or don't. without sufficient proof proving that it's shit and or harmfull to the body you have no real grounds to stand on when you say it's bs.

 

i'm not saying the honey diet is a wonder diet i'm just saying try it if you want, i posted it there so people can make up there own mind.

 

 

 

ps: i have to have a little laugh every time you use things like "investigating its validity". it's fking honey hahah. don't try it and then you'll be happy.

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You're right, it was the honey that gave Chris Hoy his gold medals, not the 15 years of hard work. Just like how Lifewave Patches made Ron Coleman what he is, not a life of dedication and steroids.

ronnie_coleman.jpg

 

I think the nails would actually have a less detrimental effect than honey. The point is I DO know what effect honey has on the body, which is why i'd want to see some facts stating otherwise, not just 1 person's opinion.

 

Why don't you try the Inedia diet, you can't say it doesn't work until you try it!

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A basic knowledge of nutrition will tell you honey DOES NOT stabilise blood sugar levels.

 

Problem is, 99% of the population DOESNT HAVE a basic knowledge of nutrition.

 

Good job Neil does.

 

GTRZ, what is the glycemic index of honey. What role does the glycemic index play in letting us know if a food will give us an insulin spike therefore causing our blood sugar levels to rise.

 

Instead of ridiculing Neil and making a dick of yourself, go and read a text book, report back what you find, or just believe everything you read on the internet by self proclaimed guru's.

 

For the record, Neil is correct, and you are so wrong its not funny.

 

Stop ridiculing people who are obviously MUCH smarter than you, it makes you look dumber than you really are.

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